Structuring Your Novel: Part Three

The motivation-reaction unit (MRU) helps writer’s structure sentences and scenes alike. It is a way of thinking about the cause and effect relationship of incidents within your story. Many writers place the effect before the cause, which makes readers slow down and think about what happened. Even a seconds slowing can distract and/or confuse aContinue reading “Structuring Your Novel: Part Three”

Structuring Your Novel: part two

The Scene is the basic building block of a story. A Scene has two parts: the action part and the reaction part. The action half of a scene consists of a goal, conflict, and disaster. The goal of a scene is usually a small piece of the overall plot goal or it can be aContinue reading “Structuring Your Novel: part two”

Overal Structure of a Novel

As some of you know, I internet and book stalk K.M. Weiland. I just finished reading her book, Structuring Your Novel Essential keys to writing an outstanding story. It’s an excellent resource for beginning and more experienced writers. Her informal witty conversational tone make the book easy to read and understand. She uses examples from her ownContinue reading “Overal Structure of a Novel”

Writing Space and First Drafts

Over the last few weeks, I have been thinking about making a space for me to write at home. Up until now, I have just sat at either the living room table or the kitchen table. This arrangement requires me to pack up all my writing gear and move it from place to place. ItContinue reading “Writing Space and First Drafts”

The Death of a Dream

The death of a dream is the worst imaginable type of death. Death in any form is awful, but to watch someone’s dreams struggle for breath, fall to its knees clutching at its heart, to never rise again is the most traumatic experience this life has to offer. Dreams are crushed everyday throughout the world.Continue reading “The Death of a Dream”

Pantsing or Outlining Your Novel

When I first began writing my memoir, Fighting for a Chance to Dream, I wrote in a haphazard style. Whichever memory popped into my head, I typed into my laptop. This would then bring another memory to the surface, and I would diligently type it up. The result, drumroll please, was a freaking train wreck.Continue reading “Pantsing or Outlining Your Novel”